John Day Bikescape

The concept of this project was to create a building that united both road cyclists, and bmx riders on the same site in John Day, Oregon. Through my analysis of the concept of “balance”, I began to develop roof forms that responded to changes in topography.

It all started with a bike ride…as slowly as possible…

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By putting chalk powder on my front tire, I was able to record the subtle turns I had to continuously make in order to remain upright.

For each movement in one direction, a rider’s center of gravity moves in the opposite direction, and the magnitude is stretched as a result of greater mass. From the exercise, I extracted two distinct “waves” which I cut out of plywood, and sewed together with yarn.

The cause-and-effect represented in this model lead to the idea of a bicycle rest-stop that responded to topographic changes.

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